Thursday, January 28, 2016

DIY Tutorial for Quilted Heart Coaster with Lulu and Celeste

Upcycled Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace

I'm sharing a guest post with you today. Ula from Lulu & Celeste is sharing a tutorial for these darling DIY quilted heart coasters. Sew these up in no time and be ready for Valentine's Day. Read on for the tutorial.



 Hi! Ula here from Lulu & Celeste. I'm happy to be sharing with you this tutorial to make a fun coaster perfect for Valentine's Day. I love making coasters. They're fairly quick projects that are great for using up scraps. I also love working with wool-blend felt, so I'm using felt here to back these coasters.

Supplies (to make one heart coaster):

  • 1 sheet (9"x12") of wool-blend felt in colour of choice
  • scrap fabric for top layer (I used some scraps of upcycled jeans)
  • scrap fabric to make hearts
  • thread, scissors, pinking shears, rotary cutter, cutting mat and clear acrylic ruler
  • Optional: small square Heat’n Bond Lite Iron-on Adhesive* (affiliate link) (optional but highly recommended)
Need tips for sewing with felt? I have a post HERE on my blog that might help! Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace

Finished size is approximately 4.5" x 5.25".

Instructions to make heart coaster:

Step 1: Cut out the pieces

  • Cut from your felt two rectangles 5" x 5.5"
  • Cut from your top fabric one rectangle 5" x 5.5"
  • If using the Heat 'n Bond: Fuse the Heat 'n Bond to the scrap of fabric for the hearts. Draw two small hearts about 1.5" across on the paper side and then cut the hearts out. If not using the Heat 'n Bond simply cut the two hearts out of your fabric.
Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace

Step 2: Fuse hearts to top fabric

If using Heat 'n Bond, follow manufacturer's instructions to fuse the hearts to your top layer of fabric, then stitch just inside the hearts. Otherwise simply stitch the hearts to the top fabric. Try to keep the hearts about 1/2" from each edge.
  Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace

Step 3: Quilt your coaster

Lay your top fabric right sides up on top the two rectangles of felt. Quilt the three layers however you'd like. I simply did straight lines: using the presser foot of machine as a guide I started by stitching the first line a presser foot width from the top edge of the front fabric and stitching each line the same distance from the line above it. When I got to the heart shapes I did a couple backstitches then lifted the needle and continued on at the other side of the heart. Just remember to backstitch again before continuing on the line. When I finished the last line, I moved the needle on my machine so that I stitched 1/4" around the entire edge of the coaster (accounting for any shifting in the fabric). It may be easier if you cut your felt pieces larger than your top fabric and then trim the felt layers down at the end.
  Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace
 Close up of the stitching so you can see I 'skipped over' the heart: Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace

Step 4: Trim threads and edges

Trim all loose threads on the front and back. Then using the pinking shears trim close to the outside stitching line. The pinked edges of the top shouldn't fray much and the felt won't fray at all. Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace

Step 5: Quilt around the heart

Since I like the drawn look of free motion applique (FMA) I decided to stitch along the inside if the heart. I stitched the lines twice to give it the FMA look. Another idea would be to do some simple quilting around the outside of the hearts either by hand or machine. Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace
 And the back:
  Heart Coaster tutorial by Lulu & Celeste for Wally and Grace
 That's it! Make some coasters and give them to your friends or family, or keep them for yourself. Thank you so much for having me Amy! If you want to see more of my tutorials come visit me at my blog Lulu & Celeste and check out my Tutorials page!

You can also check out Lulu and Celeste on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter.  

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Shwin Designs 909 Jacket

Hey readers. I am back today to show you another great jacket I sewed up recently. It's jacket time of year, after all. Where I live it doesn't usually get super cold, so I get a lot of wear out of a cozy jacket like this. I can wear this all winter. 

This is the 909 Jacket from Shwin Designs. I made it with a quilted jersey fabric from Raspberry Creek which is nice and stretchy and is really nice and warm without being too bulky. My favorite part of the jacket, though, is the back detail you can see below. This fabric is also from Raspberry Creek and it's a french terry from their exclusive line of club fabrics. 


See how cute this back detail is:

In terms of sizing for the jacket, I was near the top end of the size range for the XS, so I chose to size up to a Small in case I wanted extra room for layering. I probably would have been fine with the XS if I wasn't wearing anything too bulky underneath, but I love the coziness of this oversized jacket. And I can still wear a sweater underneath for a colder day. The body and sleeves are also nice and long on me. I did not make any changes to the lengths of the pattern, but keep in mind that I am only 5'2, so it's a bit longer than intended on me, but that is just the way I like it. 


The jacket was actually much quicker to sew up than I expected. With no facings or linings, it goes together quickly and easily. I did add a strip of stay tape to the inside of the front pieces before attaching the zipper in order to stabilize that area. The jacket may still be considered an intermediate pattern since it does involve inserting a zipper as well as sewing the point into the back detail. But overall, it is easier than most jacket patterns I have tried. 

Want to try making your own jacket? Pattern is available here:


Let's be friends! Would you like to keep up with what's going on with me and the blog? Find me on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

You can also follow me on Bloglovin

Monday, January 25, 2016

New Sabrina Slim Pants by Love Notions

One of my goals for 2016 was to make some more pants. Like, real pants that I can wear to work. I mean, my work is pretty casual, but I still like to look put together. So I had been brainstorming and sketching out the pants that I wanted to make and trying to figure out which patterns I could hack to make what I needed. The pants were a bit stretchy, with an easy pull on style and elastic waistband. They were slim through the thigh with a straight leg and had back welt pockets to dress them up a bit. 

No kidding, this is exactly what I had sketched out and not a week later, I saw a testing call at Love Notions Patterns* for the exact pants pattern I was envisioning. So I signed up to test and got to make my pants. I made two pairs to far, but I plan to make several more so that I can wear them to work every day. 

And now I get to share with you the Sabrina Slims*!


I made these out of a stretchy ponte fabric in a sophisticated charcoal gray that goes with everything. This fabric is has a really nice feel and texture to it, I wish I could find it again. I think I bought it from Mood Fabrics last fall, but I can't find it anymore, so maybe it's no longer available. 


Because it's a simple elastic waist, These pants actually sew up really quickly. The instructions for the welt pockets make those easy to sew up too. 

One of the things I enjoy about testing is that I learned a lot about fitting. Testers of all shapes and sizes sewed up samples of these pants and Tami, the designer, helped each person make theirs fabulous. She included instructions in the pattern for many common fit problems and alterations. As always, remember that it's a good idea to make a muslin first in case you need to make any changes. 


I love these because they are so comfortable. I can wear these all day and not feel like taking them off as soon as I get home. :) I teach little ones at a preschool, so I need to be able to move easily and wash them easily. These fit the bill perfectly. The higher rise allows me to sit on the floor without worrying about what's showing in the back. The welt pockets not only give them a bit of sophistication, they also stash important items like my cell phone (it fits perfectly) or tissues and notes. 



These pants are designed as an ankle length pant, but I have seen a lot of them lengthened to full length, and they still look great. The straight cut of the leg makes them easy to lengthen and I love that they look great either way. It makes them even more versatile. Since it's January, I left this pair a bit longer because my poor ankles were cold, but I wanted to show you how they look at ankle length also. 


I am going to rock the ankle length this spring and summer. How chic would they look with heels and a flowy top?

Also worth noting is that the pdf pattern is trimless and uses layers, so you only need to print your size(s) and you don't have to cut anything. There is also a large format version if you prefer to print at a copy shop. 

These pants are available now. Find them here:

Save 30% until Saturday, January 30, 2016 (no discount code needed). 


(This post contains affiliate links, which are marked with an asterisk. If you purchase through these links, I may receive a small commission, but it will not affect the cost to you. Thanks for your support of this blog.) 


Let's be friends! Would you like to keep up with what's going on with me and the blog? Find me on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

You can also follow me on Bloglovin



Wednesday, January 13, 2016

My interview with Lulu and Celeste




Hey readers! I am over at  Lulu and Celeste today doing an interview. I don't always talk a lot about me and my background, so this is a rare chance to learn more about me! Go check it out!

Amyfeature

Monday, January 4, 2016

French Terry Evergreen Jacket


I have been dying to show you this jacket I was working on before Christmas. Sadly, this jacket is not for me, even though it is my size and I am kind of in love with it. I made this jacket for my sister-in-law. Since I drew her name this year, and she had subtly requested one after seeing the one I made for me last winter (See my other Evergreen Jacket here), I knew she would like this one. I think this puts me in the running for best sister-in-law ever. *wink*

This is the Evergreen Jacket* pattern from Hey June* made with solid eggplant french terry from Raspberry Creek Fabrics. I LOVE this french terry and it was perfect for this jacket. It is a 95% cotton, 5% spandex, so it breathes, but it's so cozy. It's nice and stretchy with good recovery. I pretty much want to make everything out of this fabric this winter. 






In case you are wondering, I got my zippers from zipperstop, where I was able to order the separating zipper in exact sizes as well as matching zippers for the pockets. 

I did struggle a bit with finding the right interfacing. I auditioned several types before starting and I could not find a knit interfacing that worked well for me. I always have trouble with knit interfacing. Is it just me? I may have to do a whole blog post about it. Anyway, I ended up using this lightweight woven interfacing and it worked great. 





(This post contains affiliate links, which are marked with an asterisk. If you purchase through these links, I may receive a small commission, but it will not affect the cost to you. Thanks for your support of this blog.) 


Let's be friends! Would you like to keep up with what's going on with me and the blog? Find me on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

You can also follow me on Bloglovin